VOICES OF COLOUR

Voices of Colour is a page created to showcase the voices of students from Black, Asian or minority ethnic backgrounds, whose creativity and unique experiences are often under represented within art and literature. The School of Humanities are thrilled to provide a place to promote art and offer students a channel to publish their work.

This project enables students to showcase work that explores identity and experience. It also offers a unique perspective of both the person’s past and present, alongside future hopes and ambitions. Literature and Art have the power to resonate with diverse groups of people and promote cultural exchange and dialogue, giving you the chance to understand the unique experiences of the creators.

A poetry book is sitting on a bed of leaves

Understanding the differences and difficulties that underrepresented people face on a day to day basis is the first step in creating positive change for the future and, although this is just the beginning, we are looking forward to seeing how this project will grow.

The University of Worcester is passionate about sharing the work of its students, and promoting opportunities for artists of colour to express themselves through, but not limited to, mediums of poetry and prose.

Student showcase

Trigger Warning: These poems may contain explicit language, adult themes and content that people may find upsetting. All views expressed in this blog are the Artist’s own and do not represent the views, policies or opinions of the University of Worcester or any of its partners.

This project enables students to showcase work that explores identity and experience. It also offers a unique perspective of both the person’s past and present, alongside future hopes and ambitions. Literature and Art have the power to resonate with diverse groups of people and promote cultural exchange and dialogue, giving you the chance to understand the unique experiences of the creators.

Ray Vincent-Mills

Ray is a third-year Creative Writing and Screenwriting student at the University of Worcester. Their poem embodies their experience as a mixed-race person in British society, and how they are used as the gatekeeper to pardon the prejudicial beliefs of others. They explore the stereotypes and expectations that others have placed on them; the everyday racial profiling and the hypocritical defensiveness of discriminatory behaviour.  

“It is odd to be raised by a white woman”

When you are not one.

When everyone looking at you,

Expecting

A

Loud voice

A

Waagwarn

A

Draw

An opinion

On the N word

And whether I say it

Whether they can

With eager eyes and misleading lips.

When all the want is

A

Token

Of my appreciation

A

Lesson

On Biggie

On Tupac

To floor them with my moves

When really, I just have a lot of dance in my body

Pining to be set free.

If we were black they’d take us

I mean!

Asian

I mean they all know each other don’t they

The taxi drivers

With their curry stained directory

Penny pinching teeth

&

Lightbulb limbs.

I mean

No

I’m not racist

I work with

The Portuguese

Fleet around the polish

All the foreigners

Talk to me like I’m their fruit bowl

I’m not racist

I’m not racist

I’m not racist

I’m not,    Ray.

Parise Sayles 

“My name is Parise Sayles, and I’m a 20 year old black Caribbean female currently studying Screenwriting and Creative Writing at the University of Worcester. After I finish my final year I want to pursue a career in screenwriting, writing for tv, films and anywhere I can express my creativity.

My chosen poem “Fake Gratitude” was originally a poem I wrote about being stuck in a toxic relationship and finally being able to escape. I adapted this piece to express the oppression the black community have faced over many years. The focus is about trying to fight for freedom in a society that constantly discriminates because of your skin colour. The message is that no matter what struggles black people face, we won’t give up till our lives matter in the eyes of hate. The title reflects how many can be fake, and act supportive but their true views eventually come to light. We’re not thankful for those who claim they understand, but don’t want to fight for our rights with us.”

Mars Dafaalla

Mars Dafaalla is a multi-ethnic, 26 year old writer born and raised in Worcester. Currently in his second year of studying Screenwriting and Creative Writing, Mars hopes to go on to write a wide range of pieces – script, poetry, prose, informative etc.

His poem “Snow” was largely written the day after his younger brother’s suicide attempt. “Snow” is his attempt to explore and connect to his brother’s situation, feelings and decisions that night.

Roberto Chander

Roberto is a third-year Creative Writing student at the University of Worcester.

Roberto has blended the multiform writing skills learned from the Creative Writing course into a powerful speech that questions the prejudices a person of colour faces within the LGBTQ+ community.

This project was conceived and organised by Liam Lees (Screenwriting and Creative Writing 2021 graduate and current SU President)

If you would like more information about Creative Writing at Worcester or to submit some work to these pages please contact Dr Jack McGowan  or Ruth Stacey

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